Orthopaedic Surgery General information hip impingementSlipped Capital Femoral EpiphysisSCFE ConsentHip ArthoscopyHip OsteotomyHip SalvageAvascular NecrosisRationale for Ibandronate Injectionsibandronate Injectionsaddressshade
Figure A1Figure A2Figure B1Figure B2Figure C1blankFigure D1Figure D2Figure E1Figure E2Figure F1Figure F2 Figure F3blank

Illustrations

Figure A1. Mixed Cam & Pincer impingement before surgery
Figure A2. After femoral neck osteoplasty
Figure B1. Severe unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis
Figure B2. Surgical dislocation and subcapital reorientation of the head in severe unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis
Figure C. Bilateral caput valgum - correction with Wagner type of varus and neck lengthening osteotomy on the right for a similar deformity as seen on the left.
Figure D1. Left acetabular dysplasia with coxa valga and subluxation
Figure D2. Treated with Bernese periacetabular osteotomy with excellent correction. Massive heterotopic ossification blocking flexion required surgical excision.
Figure E1. Anterior impingement from moderate acetabular retroversion on both sides.
Figure E2. Arthroscopy was felt to risk femoral head damage due to the acetabular retroversion. Surgical dislocation for rim trimming and anteversion periacetabular osteotomy was felt to be excessive. Hence an anterior approach was used to reduce the anterior wall, refix the labrum with three suture anchors and reshape the femoral neck anteriorly. The impingement was resolved and the same procedure was performed on the right side within a few months.
Figure F1. Severe slip treated with arthroscopic Dunn type of femoral neck osteotomy, reduction and fixation
Figure F2.
Severe slip treated with arthroscopic Dunn type of femoral neck osteotomy, reduction and fixation
Figure F3.
Severe slip treated with arthroscopic Dunn type of femoral neck osteotomy, reduction and fixation